Wraparound student supports

Why Education Inequality Persists - And How To Fix It

By John Jackson, President and CEO of the Schott Foundation for Public Education, and Pedro Noguera, the Peter L. Agnew professor of education at New York University

If it takes a village to raise a child, the same village must share accountability when many children are educationally abandoned. In New York City, the nation’s largest school system, on average student outcomes and their opportunity to learn are more determined by the neighborhood where a child lives, than his or her abilities.

The following column was originally posted on The Answer Sheet blog. 

Put Students First in Education Reform!

In a fantastic column published in Amsterdam News, New York City parent organizer Ocynthia Williams criticizes Mayor Michael Bloomberg's administration for blaming schools for failure without first having "an honest discussion about why and how many of these schools have been failing for years.

It's not fair to hold students, teachers and administrators accountable for education outcomes when they lack the resources they need to succeed in the first place. But corporate-style education policies and an overemphasis on testing have resulted in an education "reform" movement that is focused exclusively on outputs rather than inputs.

State: 

Fixing Our Finance System

Publication Date: 
Tue, 2012-04-10
Author: 
Thomas Beebe, Institute for Wisconsin's Future
Type: 
policy
Category: 
equitable-instructional-materials

Fixing Wisconsin's school finance system is an issues that will come up again and again during the upcoming elections. This poliy memo provides background about that system, the impact on our schools of the most recently passed budget, and messaging points. 


State: 

Wisconsin Atlas of School Finance: Geographic, Demographic, and Fiscal Factors Affecting School Districts Across the State

Publication Date: 
Sun, 2004-02-01
Author: 
Jack Norman
Type: 
reports
Category: 
equitable-instructional-materials

This report presents in-depth data on urban, suburban, and rural districts and how they compare in the population of students they serve, the economic factors they confront, and the tax and spending responsibilities they face in Wisconsin's current school-finance system. It also includes a special section on districts in the northern lake region of the state. (44 pp.)

This report presents in-depth data on urban, suburban, and rural districts and how they compare in the population of students they serve, the economic factors they confront, and the tax and spending responsibilities they face in Wisconsin's current school-finance system. It also includes a special section on districts in the northern lake region of the state. (44 pp.)

State: 

Funding Our Future: An Adequacy Model for Wisconsin School Finance

Publication Date: 
Sat, 2002-06-01
Author: 
Jack Norman
Type: 
reports
Category: 
equitable-instructional-materials

This report describes a new school finance system—one designed to link the needs of students to the state's academic standards to ensure that all children, regardless of their special needs or the location of their schools, have the opportunity to succeed. It serves as the basis to Funding Our Future: The Wisconsin Adequacy Plan (above). The full report includes a cost-out of the Adequacy model for each of Wisconsin's 426 school districts. (111 pp.)

This report describes a new school finance system—one designed to link the needs of students to the state's academic standards to ensure that all children, regardless of their special needs or the location of their schools, have the opportunity to succeed. It serves as the basis to Funding Our Future: The Wisconsin Adequacy Plan (above). The full report includes a cost-out of the Adequacy model for each of Wisconsin's 426 school districts. (111 pp.)

State: 

Give Students Their Day in Court!

Hussein v. The State of New York is challenging the State to live up to its 2006 promise (following the the landmark Campaign for Fiscal Equity ruling) to provide all students with a "sound basic education." However, the State has repeatedly tried to have the case dismissed, which would deny parents and students their day in court to fight for equitable funding for their schools.

The fight for fair funding policies is New York is far from over. Years after the landmark Campaign for Fiscal Equity ruling, the state has reversed its promise to adequately fund schools and to provide every student with a "sound basic education" though a series of devastating education budget cuts over the last several years. Now, Hussein v. The State of New York is challenging the state to live up to its 2006 CFE promise. 

An Arkansas Student Bill of Rights - What Is It?

Publication Date: 
Wed, 2012-05-09

Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families, an OTL partner, has released "An Arkansas Student Bill of Rights," which details what students and parents should expect from their school districts and the resources and opportunities to which they are entitled in order to receive a quality education and reach their full potential. Watch the video, then download the report here!

Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families, an OTL partner, has released "An Arkansas Student Bill of Rights," which details what students and parents should expect from their school districts and the resources and opportunities to which they are entitled in order to receive a quality education and reach their full potential. Watch the video, then download the report here!

An Arkansas Student Bill of Rights

Publication Date: 
Wed, 2012-05-09
Author: 
Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families
Type: 
reports
Category: 
equitable-instructional-materials

Teachers and students shouldn’t be judged on test scores, grades, and reading levels if they don’t have the proper tools to produce high-quality outcomes. An Arkansas Student Bill of Rights, using opportunity to learn (OTL) standards as the basis for measurement and accountability, unequivocally ensures the state will provide all students with the resources necessary to obtain a high-quality public education and achieve success in college and later, a career, including access to high-quality early childhood education, prepared and effective teachers, college preperatory curriculum for all students, and equitable instructional materials.

Tackle Poverty to Provide Opportunity

Kids in poverty have less access to the quality opportunities and services they need to keep up academically with their wealthier peers. So there's no reason we shouldn't be be providing every student access to the heath care, summer enrichment programs, school meals, counseling services, etc. they need to succeed in school.

Kids in poverty have less access to the quality opportunities and services they need to keep up academically with their wealthier peers. So there's no reason we shouldn't be be providing every student access to the heath care, summer enrichment programs, school meals, counseling services, etc. they need to succeed in school. 

Dr. John Jackson, President & CEO of the Schott Foundation for Public Education, turns the "no excuses" mantra of some education reformers on its head in a recent column on the Huffington Post:

State: 

Gifted and Talented: Road to Segregation

By Michael Holzman, Senior Research Consultant for the Schott Foundation for Public Education

"Giftedness" is equally distributed throughout any given population. Why then do so many districts and counties across the country disproportionately identify enroll more White students than students of color in gifted programs and thereby give them better access to educational opportunities and quality teachers? 

Gifted and Talented students are defined by the U. S.

State: 

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