Healthy Living and Learning

Family Separation in America Goes Beyond Immigration Policy

Allison Brown
We must continue to stand with our brothers and sisters from other nations that are fighting for their human rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. We also have an opportunity to use this moment and the power of our collective passion to fight against the family separation that has become common place in America over the past several decades, often unnoticed and without the same passion and resistance. Any time we lock up adults or children for nonviolent crimes, instead of showing compassion for their situation and a productive path forward, we are separating families. Instead, we need to adopt Loving Systems. Systems that take individual circumstances into consideration and create access to supports and rehabilitation that keep families together and enable them to thrive.

The issue of family separation has grabbed national headlines and public attention, as we have all witnessed the adoption and subsequent resistance against inhumane immigration policy.

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An Eye on the Buckeyes

by Cassie Schwerner, Senior Vice President of National Partnerships
Schott has been examining the adoption of whole-child supports in schools and communities across the country as part of our newly launched Healthy Living and Learning Initiative. Schott's SVP, Cassie Schwerner, was invited to Cincinnati to see how whole-child approaches have been adopted to provide students with health services, early learning opportunities and other needs that holistically support their learning and development. While there’s an incredible amount of public and private programs and initiatives taking shape in the city, there were three programs that really stood out as the epitome of healthy living and learning.

I grew up near Cincinnati and had been surprised to learn that it is one of the nation’s leaders in adopting whole-child practices.  Schott has been examining the adoption of whole-child supports in schools and communities across the country as part of our newly launched Healthy Living and Learning Initiative.  I was recently speaking about Schott’s vision and goals for this work with a small group of sector leaders, and was invited by Cincinnati philanthropist, Lee Carter, to come see the work unfolding in Cincinnati.

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Why are we talking about Love?

by Allison Brown

Regardless of where you fall on the political spectrum, the one thing most Americans can agree with is that the system is not working for everyone.

Our education system is only providing opportunities for success to a portion of our children. Healthcare is largely unaffordable and inaccessible. Corporations have more rights than the people employed there and getting fair pay and personal leave is a luxury afforded only to the most elite. And our financial systems reinforce the inequities of all these other systems, pushing low and middle-income individuals into debt and eviscerating their opportunity to build wealth across generations.

Regardless of where you fall on the political spectrum, the one thing most Americans can agree with is that the system is not working for everyone.

Webinar: First Look at The Loving Cities Index

In the midst of our current challenges and unique political moment, it is necessary to declare a new day in America for our young people. America’s new day must start by acknowledging the fact that providing all children an opportunity to learn requires that we provide them with the supports they need to thrive outside the school, starting at birth.

Throughout American history, the policies and practices that created opportunity gaps from birth have been baked into the ecosystem of local and state systems. It is well documented that many of these policies and practices were rooted in implicit racial bias at best, and explicit racism and hate at worst. Even today, far too many of the the policies and practices that govern how cities manage and resource housing, education, healthcare, transportation, workforce development, criminal justice, and civic engagement reinforce inequity in outcomes for children and families of color compared to their White peers by creating a system of barriers to success across all facets of a child’s living and learning environments from the time of their birth.

Today, our best shot for healing communities of their achievement gap is by addressing the larger living climate opportunity gaps. Likewise, our best chance for supporting healing in communities harmed by practices rooted in hate is through current practices that create loving systems.

In the midst of our current challenges and unique political moment, it is necessary to declare a new day in America for our young people. America’s new day must start by acknowledging the fact that providing all children an opportunity to learn requires that we provide them with the supports they need to thrive outside the school, starting at birth.

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