Wraparound Student Supports

Wraparound Student Supports

In order to help all students succeed, our nation must provide supports and opportunities that extend beyond the classroom to address the many and varied needs students bring with them to school. Because of their centralized location in the community, schools are an ideal place to house and coordinate access to a host of wraparound supports for students and their families, including health services, socio-emotional supports, tutoring, afterschool programs, pre-kindergarten, job training, English classes and more

The Latest on Wraparound Student Supports

Policy Guide
Wednesday April 11, 2012 –

In 2010, the President set a goal for the U.S. to become the global leader in postsecondary degree attainment by the year 2020. Yet, more than 7,000 students, many of whom are not proficient in reading and math, are leaving or being pushed out of U.S. schools each day. This study shows that the U.S. cannot achieve the President’s 2020 goal if our schools continue to hemorrhage large segments of our nation’s youth. Accordingly, this document is designed to serve as a blueprint for implementing a comprehensive package of policy reforms that seek to increase the quantity of students who succeed at every stage of the educational pipeline and the quality of the education they receive. Different from most calls for reform, it considers the educational pipeline in its entirety—from early childhood through postsecondary attainment—and offers evidence‐informed strategies to boost access, quantity and quality at every stage.

Policy Guide
Tuesday April 10, 2012 –

Fixing Wisconsin's school finance system is an issues that will come up again and again during the upcoming elections. This poliy memo provides background about that system, the impact on our schools of the most recently passed budget, and messaging points. 

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Thursday April 5, 2012 –

 From AQE, a great video recap of advocacy efforts in NY and the difference parents, students and teachers can make in the fight for quality public education. 

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Friday March 30, 2012 –

Raise Your Hand Campaign is a student-led research initiative in New Orleans schools that pulled together student testimony and research from 6 different public high schools to examine the opportunities, or lack thereof, available to students in the years after Hurricane Katrina devastated the city. The report the students assembled (download here) examines everything from teaching quality and student support services to physical environment and school food, and gives each school a report card and recommendations for improvement. Altogether, the Raise Your Hand Campaign is a stunning example of students organizing to make their voices heard in the education reform debate. Watch the video chronicling their initiative below.

Report
Friday March 30, 2012 –

This student-led research initiative in New Orleans schools pulls together student testimony and research from 6 different public high schools and examine the opportunities, or lack thereof, available to students in the years after Hurricane Katrina devastated the city. The report examines everything from teaching quality and student support services to physical environment and school food, and gives each school a report card and recommendations for improvement. Altogether, the report is a stunning example of students organizing to make their voices heard in the education reform debate. The full report is available to download at the bottom of this post. To download just the executive summary, click here.

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Report
Friday March 30, 2012 –

This student-led research initiative in New Orleans schools pulls together student testimony and research from 6 different public high schools and examine the opportunities, or lack thereof, available to students in the years after Hurricane Katrina devastated the city. The report examines everything from teaching quality and student support services to physical environment and school food, and gives each school a report card and recommendations for improvement. Altogether, the report is a stunning example of students organizing to make their voices heard in the education reform debate. 

Executive summary is available to download at the bottom of this post. To download the full report, click here.

Report
Wednesday February 22, 2012 –

In "We're Not Even Allowed to Ask," The Coalition for Asian American Children and Families dubunks the myth of Asian Pacific Americans (APAs) as model minority students and shows they face the same opportunity and achievement gaps as other minority groups in New York City schools. 

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Tuesday February 21, 2012 –

Arkansas Public Policy Panel Executive Director Bill Kopsky outlines 8 characteristics of effective school systems that guarantee every child has an opportunity to learn. This clip is excerpted from a longer television workshop on the Arkansas dropout rate that aired in November on AETN - the Arkansas PBS affiliate. 

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Wednesday January 25, 2012 –

Michael Diedrich, policy analyst for Minesota 2020, explains why quality education is unlike other goods and services provided by the competitive market and why market-based education policy is the wrong approach for reform. 

Toolkit
Thursday December 1, 2011 –

From our Opportunity to Learn Campaign, the School-to-Prison Pipeline Toolkit includes an overview, talking points, key data and resources – everything you'll need to advocate for a fair and substantive opportunity to learn for all children.

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