Wraparound Student Supports

Wraparound Student Supports

In order to help all students succeed, our nation must provide supports and opportunities that extend beyond the classroom to address the many and varied needs students bring with them to school. Because of their centralized location in the community, schools are an ideal place to house and coordinate access to a host of wraparound supports for students and their families, including health services, socio-emotional supports, tutoring, afterschool programs, pre-kindergarten, job training, English classes and more

The Latest on Wraparound Student Supports

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Wednesday July 25, 2012 –

Over the next several months, the New York Education Commission will be hosting public hearings across the state. Check out this video from Alliance for Quality Education to learn how to register to speak at your local regional meeting!

Report
Friday June 22, 2012 –

The Second Edition of the National Report Card on public school funding, Is School Funding Fair?, shows that far too many states continue to deny public schools the essential resources they need to meet the needs of the nation's 53 million students and to boost academic achievement. The National Report Card rates the 50 states on the basis of four "fairness indicators" - funding level, funding distribution, state fiscal effort, and public school coverage. The Report provides the most in-depth analysis to date of state education finance systems and school funding fairness across the nation. How does your state measure up? 

Report
Wednesday June 13, 2012 –

Roughly 10 percent of U.S. students are chronically absent from the classroom - defined as missing 10 percent or more of the school year. Chronic absenteeism increases achievement gaps at the elementary, middle, and high school levels, particularly for low-income students. This report, from the Everyone Graduates Center, identifies the causes of students' long term absence from the classroom (illness, housing instability, involvement in the juvenile justice system and the lack of consequences for skipping) and details the dire academic consequences for chronically absent students. The report also criticizes the fact that few school districts and states bother to measure and analyzes attendance data and, consequently, overlook and do not act upon chronic absenteeism. 

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Friday May 25, 2012 –

Appleseed asks parents, educators and student board members to take action to make schools more equitable across the nation. 

And be sure to check out Appleseed's Resource Equity Assessment Document, a great resource for school boards and communities to measure the distribution of educational resources within and between districts. Download it here!

Toolkit
Friday May 25, 2012 –

The Resource Equity Assessment Document (READ) helps school boards and communities to measure the distribution of educational resources within and between districts. In doing so, they can engage in comparative assessment of problem spots and points of pride. 

Download the resource (as a PDF) below!

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Wednesday May 9, 2012 –

Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families, an OTL partner, has released "An Arkansas Student Bill of Rights," which details what students and parents should expect from their school districts and the resources and opportunities to which they are entitled in order to receive a quality education and reach their full potential. Watch the video, then download the report here!

Report
Wednesday May 9, 2012 –

Teachers and students shouldn’t be judged on test scores, grades, and reading levels if they don’t have the proper tools to produce high-quality outcomes. An Arkansas Student Bill of Rights, using opportunity to learn (OTL) standards as the basis for measurement and accountability, unequivocally ensures the state will provide all students with the resources necessary to obtain a high-quality public education and achieve success in college and later, a career, including access to high-quality early childhood education, prepared and effective teachers, college preperatory curriculum for all students, and equitable instructional materials.

Policy Guide
Tuesday April 17, 2012 –

This policy brief from the New York City Working Group on School Transformation criticizes NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg's education reform strategy of closing low-performing schools. Evidence from the NYC Department of Education reveals that its school-assignment policies concentrate the highest-needs students in struggling schools, exacerbating the low performance that leads to the subsequent closing of these schools. The brief calls for the DOE to build the instructional capacity across NYC public schools to support the lowest-performing schools rather than simply closing them. 

Report
Tuesday April 17, 2012 –

In New York City public schools, a student's chances for educational success are more often determined by where he or she lives than their abilities. The city's education policies and practices have resulted in an inequitable distribution of educational resources that intensifies the impact of poverty and denies certain students a meaningful education. Similar to the "redlining" banking practices that once denied investments to communities of color, the education landscape today effectively redlines students of color and low-income students from the resources they need to succeed.

Policy Guide
Wednesday April 11, 2012 –

In 2010, the President set a goal for the U.S. to become the global leader in postsecondary degree attainment by the year 2020. Yet, more than 7,000 students, many of whom are not proficient in reading and math, are leaving or being pushed out of U.S. schools each day. This study shows that the U.S. cannot achieve the President’s 2020 goal if our schools continue to hemorrhage large segments of our nation’s youth. Accordingly, this document is designed to serve as a blueprint for implementing a comprehensive package of policy reforms that seek to increase the quantity of students who succeed at every stage of the educational pipeline and the quality of the education they receive. Different from most calls for reform, it considers the educational pipeline in its entirety—from early childhood through postsecondary attainment—and offers evidence‐informed strategies to boost access, quantity and quality at every stage.

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