New York

"Talk It Out!" – NYC Students Create Peer Mediation Music Video

Publication Date: 
Tue, 2013-10-22

Students from the Morris Campus Student Leadership Council (at Bronx International High School in NYC) came together to write and create this video to promote peer mediation at their school. The song is called "Talk It Out," and the video was featured during the Youth Speak Out session at the recent AFT Civil, Human and Women's Rights Conference in Los Angeles.

Students from the Morris Campus Student Leadership Council (at Bronx International High School in NYC) came together to write and create this video to promote peer mediation at their school. The song is called "Talk It Out," and the video was featured during the Youth Speak Out session at the recent AFT Civil, Human and Women's Rights Conference in Los Angeles.

NYC DOE's Data Shows Fewer Resources for Students of Color

A new report finds that while White students in NYC schools have access to an average of 11.2 Advanced Placement classes, Black and Latino students have access to just 5.4, echoing similar disparities in resources like science labs, libraries and school health services.

What would you do if your child couldn't get into college because your local public school doesn't offer Advanced Placement Chemistry or Biology, especially if schools on the other side of the city offer all the classes needed to prepare students for college?

Mass School Closures Are "Shock Doctrine" for Education

Mass school closures are the "shock doctrine" of the education world. But parents, students, teachers and communities are fighting back to ensure their public schools receive the investments and supports they need to succeed.

When 9-year-old Asean Johnson gave his now-famous, fiery speech last spring at a rally to protest the mass closure of 49 Chicago public schools, he drew enough national attention that his school, at least, was spared.

NY Gov. Proposes "Death Penalty" for Schools

NY Governor Andrew Cuomo thinks struggling public schools should be given the "death penalty." Rather than supporting these schools with additional resources, he thinks they should be closed down, taken over by the state, or turned into charter schools.

NY Governor Andrew Cuomo thinks struggling public schools should be given the "death penalty." Rather than supporting these schools with additional resources, he thinks they should be closed down, taken over by the state, or turned into charter schools.

What Does the Drop in NYC Test Scores Really Show Us?

By Michael Holzman, Schott Foundation

No student learns well in places where resources are systematically diverted from where they are needed to places where wealthier families live. The results of the Common Core-aligned 2013 New York State tests of students paint a stark picture of systemic inequality in access to education resources and opportunities.

The results of the 2013 New York State tests of students in grades 3-8 have been greeted with consternation, as they should be, but it should be emphasized that they paint a picture of a system—especially that part administered by the New York City Department of Education—that is far gone in failure. This is simply the most recent indication of that failure and the Department’s lack of attention to its responsibilities.

Will You Join the Supports-Based Education Movement?

Joe Bishop, National Opportunity to Learn Campaign

District, state and federal policies have focused primarily on efforts to raise standards, improve assessments, and evaluate teachers. While each of these issues warrants attention in the landscape of education policy, they are not effective drivers for significantly changing the learning conditions for students across the country.

Last week, New York education officials released scores from the first Common Core-aligned standardized state tests. Student scores showed a dramatic drop in performance from previous years. Statewide, just 31.1 percent of students tested proficient in English Language Arts, and 31 percent tested proficient in math.

Failing to the Top: How Students Are Being Set Up to Fail

By Jeff Bryant, Education Opportunity Network

As new Common Core-aligned tests roll out in the states and student scores plummet under the higher standards, it's worth pointing out how students are set up to fail by education policies that establish standards without providing the resources and opportunities students need to meet them.

I have this recurring nightmare – one that, I fear, is about to become reality for most of America’s school children.

In my dream, I’m back in elementary school. It’s testing day and I’m struggling to remember my locker combination and get to class on time. My backpack implausibly opens and spills its contents into the hallway. Indifferent schoolmates rush by.

NY Allies React to Test Score Drop: "Proves We Need Supports, Not Just Standards"

After the release of New York's test scores from the first Common-Core aligned state test, advocates and organizers are taking officials to task for implementing the new standards without also ensuring schools and students have the resources they need to meet those standards. The problem for many OTL allies isn't the achievement gap, it's the continually unaddressed opportunity gap that creates it.

This week New York education officials released the scores from the first Common Core-aligned standardized state tests. The scores dropped dramatically from previous years, the result of the standards being higher and the test being harder. Statewide, just 31.1 percent of students tested proficient in English Language Arts, and 31 percent tested proficient in math.

Ed Reform Should Focus on "Whole Child, Whole School, Whole City"

Four months after its exciting bus tour through NYC's boroughs, A+ NYC has released "Whole Child, Whole School, Whole City," an engaging report illustrating the ideas that parents, students, educators, and community members want the next NYC mayor to consider to support their schools and help every kid succeed.

Remember that awesome bus tour we told you about last March – the one where A+ NYC painted an old school bus blue and went around to each New York City borough to get input from community members about what would make their schools great? Yep, that one.

Whole Child, Whole School, Whole City: An Education Roadmap for the Next Mayor

Publication Date: 
Wed, 2013-07-24
Type: 
policy
Category: 
equitable-instructional-materials

Over the last year the A+ NYC coalition held countless workshops and visited every corner of the city in a big blue bus, gathering perspectives on how to create a world-class school system where every student can succeed. The result is the PS 2013 Education Roadmap for the Next Mayor — an unparalleled set of recommendations that sketch an inspiring vision of an education system that treasures the complexity of children and their communities; equips schools with the tools to prepare students for a range of destinies; and works interdependently to leverage the city’s vast resources in service of schools.

State: 

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