New York

59 Years After Brown vs. Board, an "Education Spring" Is Here

May 17th is the 59th anniversary of the historic Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision. Decades later, students, parents, teacher and advocates are still fighting against education policies that leave students of color and low-income students deprived of the resources and opportunities they need to succeed. But a grassroots revolution is brewing, what blogger Jeff Bryant has been calling an "education spring," and this past week has seen headline-grabbing victories and inspiring actions.

Today is the 59th anniversary of the historic Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court decision. Almost six decades later, students, parents, teachers and advocates across the country are still fighting against education policies that leave students of color and low-income students deprived of the resources and opportunities they need to succeed.

Rhee-ality Check: The Failure of StudentsFirst

While the "reform" agenda of Michelle Rhee and her StudentsFirst organization has been thoroughly debunked, a new report from New Yorkers for Great Public Schools takes a look at the ineffectiveness of StudentsFirst as an advocacy group in an education reform landscape that is increasingly disillusioned with high-stakes tests and standards-based reform.

Since its launch two years ago, Michelle Rhee's StudentsFirst advocacy group has pushed the type "no excuses" and accountability-focus education policies that Rhee implemented during her time as the Chancellor of D.C. Public Schools.

Rhee-ality Check: The Failure of StudentsFirst

Publication Date: 
Tue, 2013-05-14
Type: 
reports
Category: 
equitable-instructional-materials

Since its launch two years ago, Michelle Rhee's StudentsFirst advocacy group has pushed the type "no excuses" and accountability-focus education policies that Rhee implemented during her time as the Chancellor of D.C. Public Schools. While her methods have been thoroughly debunked, this report from New Yorkers for Great Public Schools takes a look at the ineffectiveness of StudentsFirst as an advocacy group.

How to Close the Opportunity Gap: Key Policy Recommendations

Publication Date: 
Mon, 2013-05-13
Type: 
policy
Category: 
equitable-instructional-materials

The National Education Policy Center's new book "Closing the Opportunity Gap" offers a wide array of policy recommendations for closing the opportunity gap and ensuring all students have the resources they need to succeed. This policy guide distills the most important recommendations from the book at three different levels: at the level of students' individual needs, at the level of in-school opportunities and resources, and at the level of communities and neighborhoods.

Moving From Standards to Supports

By John H. Jackson, President & CEO, Schott Foundation

Standards-based reform creates an inherent system of winners and losers by raising the bar and assessing who makes the cut. Supports-based reforms provide and strategically align the needed resources so each student has the opportunity to reach that bar—and surpass it.

In his second inaugural address, President Barack Obama returned repeatedly to the theme of "we the people" and the ever-more-inclusive nature of that "we" in our nation.

Buffalo NY Embraces Solutions Not Suspensions

In the three years since high school student Jawaan Daniels was fatally shot at a bus stop after being suspended from school for wandering the halls, advocates and organizers in Buffalo, NY, have built a movement to reform the district's discipline policies. Their hard work paid off in April when the school board approved a new student code of conduct that limits the use of out-of-school suspensions.

In the three years since high school student Jawaan Daniels was fatally shot at a bus stop after being suspended from school for wandering the halls, advocates and organizers in Buffalo, NY, have built a movement to reform the district's discipline policies.

New Book: Closing the Opportunity Gap

The National Center for Education Policy (NEPC), an OTL ally, has a new, must-read book about the change our nation needs to make from thinking about the achievement gap to trying to fix the opportunity gap that underlies it.

The National Center for Education Policy (NEPC), an OTL ally, has a new, must-read book about the change our nation needs to make from thinking about the achievement gap to trying to fix the opportunity gap that underlies it.

Our "Model T" Education System Has to Go

Dr. Patrick Michel, District Superintendent, HFM BOCES

Our schools operate today with a system that was cutting edge when the Model T first rolled off the assembly line. While countries like Finland and South Korea blow by us on the education race track, our policymakers have refused to invest in the resources our schools need to provide students with 21st century skills.

Let’s be honest about something while we struggle with this slumping economy, reductions in state education spending and the suffering caused by high unemployment. In New York State’s quest to become more business friendly and economically stable and to create jobs, we are acquiescing to the sacrifice of the here and now. Now more than ever we need to make significant investments in our young people.

The Color of School Closures

Publication Date: 
Fri, 2013-04-26
Type: 
graphs-visuals
Category: 
equitable-instructional-materials

Mass school closings have become a hallmark of today's dominant education policy agenda. But rather than helping students, these closures disrupt whole communities. And as U.S. Department of Education data suggests, the most recent rounds of mass closings in Chicago, New York City and Philadelphia disproportionately hurt Black and low-income students.

Click here to learn about alternatives that support students rather than close school doors on them.

Mass school closings have become a hallmark of today's dominant education policy agenda. But rather than helping students, these closures disrupt whole communities. And as U.S. Department of Education data suggests, the most recent rounds of mass closings in Chicago, New York City and Philadelphia disproportionately hurt Black and low-income students.

Click here to learn about alternatives that support students rather than close school doors on them.

College Prep Crisis in NYC Schools – And What to Do About It

New York City is caught in a college prep crisis: Budget cuts and pressure to perform well on high-stakes tests is limiting the ability K-12 public schools to prepare students for college. This puts a financial strain on new college students who must spend precious tuition dollars on remedial classes re-learning what they should have been taught for free in high school.

It's a sad fact that a high school diploma from New York City public schools today doesn't mean a student is ready for college. In fact, 80 percent of enrolled students at the City University of New York's community colleges last fall required remedial classes in reading, writing and math.

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