New York

A new approach to expanded learning time

By Lucy Friedman, Founding President of TASC (The After-School Corporation)

A growing body of research shows that the typical six-hour school day just doesn’t cut it for many students. Too many schools lack the time and funds for arts, recess or inquiry-driven projects that inspire a life-long love of learning and provide skills needed to be competitive in the 21st century. The challenges and needs are particularly dramatic in low-income communities where students are the most likely to be behind grade level and who stand to benefit most from additional learning time. ExpandED Schools is a promising new model to help reinvent schools that are struggling to deliver on the promise of high-quality education for all students.

A growing body of research shows that the typical six-hour school day just doesn’t cut it for many students. Too many schools lack the time and funds for arts, recess or inquiry-driven projects that inspire a life-long love of learning and provide skills needed to be competitive in the 21st century.

The challenges and needs are particularly dramatic in low-income communities where students are the most likely to be behind grade level and who stand to benefit most from additional learning time. 

NYC: More “good standing” schools for richer kids

By Michael Holzman, Senior Research Consultant, The Schott Foundation for Public Education

Recent data continue to show that in New York City, the nation’s largest school district, a student’s opportunity to learn in a school “In Good Standing,” as measured by the state’s own tests, depends on the financial status of the student’s family.

Recent data continue to show that in New York City, the nation’s largest school district, a student’s opportunity to learn in a school “In Good Standing,” as measured by the state’s own tests, depends on the financial status of the student’s family.

State: 

Report details New York’s slide toward inequality under Gov. Cuomo education budget

By Billy Easton, Executive Director, Alliance for Quality Education

Gov. Andrew Cuomo got the attention of public school advocates across the Empire State when he campaigned as “the Great Equalizer” for schools that would not be afraid to steer money from wealthy districts to poor under-resourced districts. But not only has he failed to deliver on that promise, but a new report details just how far in the other direction the state has gone since he was elected.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo got the attention of public school advocates across the Empire State when he campaigned as “the Great Equalizer” for schools that would not be afraid to steer money from wealthy districts to poor under-resourced districts.

It seemed reasonable to believe that as a self-proclaimed progressive candidate he would continue to keep New York schools on the path to equity started in 2007 after the successful Campaign for Fiscal Equity school funding lawsuit.

State: 

Most NYC high school grads not college-ready

It’s a sad state of affairs when only one in four students attending high school in New York City are ready for college four years later, and even sadder that only half of those even enroll. But that’s exactly the state of affairs, according to the A-through-F high school report cards recently released. A recent New York Times article reported:

Those numbers, included for the first time in the report cards, confirmed what the state suggested several months ago: the city still has a long way to go to prepare students for successful experiences in college and beyond.

It’s a sad state of affairs when only one in four students attending high school in New York City are ready for college four years later, and even sadder that only half of those even enroll. But that’s exactly the state of affairs, according to the A-through-F high school report cards recently released.

A recent New York Times article reported:

State: 

Lost Opportunity 50 State Report

Publication Date: 
Wed, 2009-09-23
Type: 
reports

In Lost Opportunity: A 50 State Report on the Opportunity to Learn in America, the Schott Foundation for Public Education establishes a metric for determining the opportunity to learn for students. Providing a state-by-state comparison of both academic proficiency (percentage of students scoring at or above proficient on the eighth grade NAEP reading exam) and equity (as measured by the Schott Foundation’s Opportunity to Learn Index, or OTLI), Lost Opportunity identifies the four baseline minimum resources that are necessary for a child – regardless of race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status – to have a fair and substantive Opportunity to Learn.

In the United States, every student should have the equal right to a high-quality education.  But as our most recent data demonstrates, for far too many students, quality and equity are aspirations, not realities.  Few states are providing public school educations that result in academic proficiency for students.  And even fewer states are providing access to a high-quality education to all students, particularly those from historically disadvantaged groups.

They're walking 150 miles to save their public schools. Here's how you can help

Why are advocates walking from New York City to Albany?

In 2006, New York State’s highest court ruled on the Campaign for Fiscal Equity (CFE) school funding lawsuit. The CFE lawsuit was brought by parents against the State of New York claiming that children were not being provided an opportunity to receive an adequate education.

The Schott Foundation was among the first to fund the Campaign for Fiscal Equity in the mid-1990s which sparked a movement — and a victory. In 2006 the Court of Appeals ruled in CFE’s favor and found that New York State had violated students' constitutional right to a “sound and basic education” by depriving schools of needed funding. The Court ordered the NY Legislature to distribute $5.5 billion in basic operating aid (also known as Foundation Aid) to schools statewide over a four-year period, from 2007 to 2011.

Yet — ten years later — New York still owes its children $3.9 billion in Foundation Aid, most of which is owed to districts with high percentages of students of color. The state has only allocated $2.3 billion in Foundation Aid to schools thus far due to funding freezes during the fiscal crisis and further cuts to school aid.

CFE advocates need your support!
Education advocates are walking from NYC to Albany and need your help!
State: 

Youth Leaders are Changing the Conversation on College Access

“If you have a friend of a friend with a kid – even a stranger – remind them that they’re worth something.”

Student Karoline Jimenez urged this of her audience after an hour of tears and testimony at the Philanthropy New York (PNY) June 17th screening of Stepping Up, a glimpse into the world of college access by filmmaker Julie Dressner. This feature-length documentary will highlight the woefully high 250:1 student-to-guidance counselor ratio in New York City. Guidance counselors have little time, says the film, to spend with their assigned students on college guidance, and there are deep disparities between students from low-income and high-income backgrounds who succeed in obtaining a bachelor’s degree. In an effort to close this guidance gap, then-high school students Karoline and friends Christine Rodriguez and Enoch Jemmott commit to helping their peers navigate the college application process. Stepping Up follows the three young people, trained by College Access: Research & Action (CARA), on their journey as high school peer counselors, even as they themselves undergo the intensive process of applying to schools.


Cassie Schwerner, Karoline Jimenez, Enoch Jemmott, and Juliane Dressner

“If you have a friend of a friend with a kid – even a stranger – remind them that they’re worth something.”

State: 

Is school funding fair? For too many students, the answer is still no.

Since 2010, the Education Law Center has published national report cards on how states are (or aren't) investing in their schools and students. "Is School Funding Fair? A National Report Card" released Wednesday, paints a worrying picture. In most states, ELC has found that public funding for schools is both unfair and inequitable: that is, not only are schools not receiving the funds they need, the schools that need funding the most are the ones with the most dramatic shortfalls.

New York Schools Still Underfunded

New York Governor Cuomo gave his State of the State address on January 13th, mentioning numerous plans to increase educational opportunities for students in the state. He discussed community schools, preK programs, and increasing education funding. However, some education advocates have argued that the proposed funding increase still falls under what New York owes its public schools. One of our grantees, The Alliance for Quality Education, released a new report that talks about the now decade-old Supreme Court case that mandated New York fully fund its education system, and shows what steps are really necessary to ensure that happens.

New York Governor Cuomo gave his State of the State address on January 13th, mentioning numerous plans to increase educational opportunities for students in the state. He discussed community schools, preK programs, and increasing education funding. However, some education advocates have argued that the proposed funding increase still falls under what New York owes its public schools.

State: 

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