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Journey for Justice Releases Stunning New Documentary

Just yesterday, Schott grantee partner Journey for Justice Alliance released a compelling short documentary chronicling the fight against education reform in the age of Trump and DeVos. Beyond the rhetoric coming from DC, for years Journey for Justice has been raising the voices of those most impacted by budget cuts and privatization. Following J4J's trip from Detroit to Washington, D.C. to oppose Betsy DeVos' appointment as Education Secretary in early 2017, this film not only shows the profound hurt that these policy changes cause, but the inspiring organizing done to resist them.

Just yesterday, Schott grantee partner Journey for Justice Alliance released a compelling short documentary chronicling the fight against education reform in the age of Trump and DeVos. Beyond the rhetoric coming from DC, for years Journey for Justice has been raising the voices of those most impacted by budget cuts and privatization. Following J4J's cross-country trip from Detroit to Washington, D.C.

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Public School Students Continue to Lead the Nation to a Better Place

by Dr. John H. Jackson, Schott Foundation President & CEO

Despite the contrived false narrative of failing students and schools, the nation’s public school students are once again leading the nation to a more just society and a stronger democracy. During the civil rights movement of the 50’s and 60’s it was public school students walking out of schools, sitting at lunch counters, and marching on Washington that shaped the civil rights movement.

Despite the contrived false narrative of failing students and schools, the nation’s public school students are once again leading the nation to a more just society and a stronger democracy. During the civil rights movement of the 50’s and 60’s it was public school students walking out of schools, sitting at lunch counters, and marching on Washington that shaped the civil rights movement.

Getting to the Right Answer Starts with Asking the Right Questions

by Dr. John H. Jackson, Schott Foundation President & CEO

I was recently interviewed by a local urban newspaper following the tragic shooting of 17 students and educators at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. The first question was, “What can schools do to stop a shooter who comes to their school?” Whether the journalist just phrased the question badly or was resolved that this is a new reality – the question hit me the same. How to stop a shooter when they’re at a school is the wrong question to ask. After calmly responding “nothing,” I explained to the journalist that if a distraught individual is able to arm themselves with an AR-15 automatic rifle and desires to use that on school grounds, it is very likely that unnecessary casualties would follow.

The question we should be asking is: “What can we do to impact the factors that lead to such a horrific act of violence?”

I was recently interviewed by a local urban newspaper following the tragic shooting of 17 students and educators at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. The first question was, “What can schools do to stop a shooter who comes to their school?” Whether the journalist just phrased the question badly or was resolved that this is a new reality – the question hit me the same. How to stop a shooter when they’re at a school is the wrong question to ask.

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Native Youth Education & Health: Is Philanthropy up to the Challenge?

The Schott Foundation for Public Education in partnership with Native Americans in Philanthropy, with support from Nike N7, recently released a set of recommendations for helping Native youth live healthy lives. These recommendations came directly from Native American leaders who hold expertise across health, physical fitness, education and youth development sectors. The report, Original Instructions, outlines both challenges and opportunities to philanthropy. It’s a first step towards using our resources to recognize and learn from the resilient Native youth.

In recent years, philanthropy has experienced a surge of interest in supporting racial equity across this country. It’s an encouraging trend, but our sector has a great deal of work ahead of us to counter a long history of neglect of Native American organizations. To put it in perspective: Native Americans make up 2 percent of our country’s population, yet their communities receive less than 0.3 percent of philanthropic dollars.

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Original Instructions: A Challenge to Philanthropy to Expand Health and Educational Opportunities for Native Youth

Publication Date: 
Fri, 2018-01-12
Type: 
reports

The Schott Foundation for Public Education in partnership with Native Americans in Philanthropy, with support from Nike N7, recently released a set of recommendations for helping Native youth live healthy lives. These recommendations came directly from Native American leaders who hold expertise across health, physical fitness, education and youth development sectors. The report, Original Instructions, outlines both challenges and opportunities to philanthropy. It’s a first step towards using our resources to recognize and learn from the resilient Native youth.

Original Instructions
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Want some good news? Here are 10 inspiring victories by grantee partners in 2017

In many ways 2017 seemed like a never-ending stream of bad news and attacks on public education. However, advocates kept up the good fight and the movement for education justice saw growth and increased capacity. Thanks to our grantee partners and allies working tirelessly in communities across the country, we’d like to share some good news! In no particular order, here are the top 10 policy wins our grantee partners helped secure. These victories give us hope for 2018 and reinforce the idea that positive change in public education starts at the grassroots.

In many ways 2017 seemed like a never-ending stream of bad news and attacks on public education. However, advocates kept up the good fight and the movement for education justice saw growth and increased capacity. Thanks to our grantee partners and allies working tirelessly in communities across the country, we’d like to share some good news!

Use #GivingTuesday for Education Justice

Here at the Schott Foundation, we believe the people most impacted and with the most at stake should be at the forefront of social change. We work to amplify local voices and encourage community leaders to speak out on critical issues, providing tailored support and trainings to strengthen efforts for change across the country.

Schott is excited to highlight four of our vibrant community partners on this year’s Giving Tuesday, an annual event that spotlights nonprofit organizations working to make a difference in their communities. Our partners are proof that when communities come together and organize, they can achieve anything—no matter where they are. 

Your generous donation will support Schott’s ability to provide funding to these dynamic grassroots organizations on the front lines of the fight for education justice, as well as the network-building, policy advocacy and communications resources they need to lead the movement for social change. 100 percent of all donations will go to these four partners.

Rural Community Alliance Journey for Justice Arkansas United Community Coalition

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"The Business of Social Justice": Schott COO Heidi Brooks Profiled by Harvard Business School

The Schott Foundation's chief operating officer, Heidi Brooks, was recently profiled in Harvard Business School's alumni magazine, chronicling her work not just at Schott but across her entire globe-spanning career:

A born adventurer with a passion for social justice, Heidi Brooks (MBA 2003) uses her business savvy to effect social change.

Since 2014 Brooks has served as chief operating officer of the Schott Foundation for Public Education, a nonprofit organization focused on strengthening public education through grants and advocacy. The organization seeks to end the school-to-prison pipeline through disciplinary reform and ensure that schools with high needs receive the necessary resources and funding to achieve their goals.

Heidi Brooks

The Schott Foundation's chief operating officer, Heidi Brooks, was recently profiled in Harvard Business School's alumni magazine, chronicling her work not just at Schott but across her entire globe-spanning career:

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Resurgence: Restructuring Urban American Indian Education

Publication Date: 
Thu, 2017-11-16
Type: 
reports
This report – the first of its kind – highlights the challenges facing urban Native American youth in public schools and showcases seven alternative public education programs that are having a positive impact in addressing these challenges.

This report – the first of its kind – highlights the challenges facing urban Native American youth in public schools and showcases seven alternative public education programs that are having a positive impact in addressing these challenges.

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How Can We Expand Opportunities to Learn for Native Youth?

A groundbreaking new report released yesterday details the barriers facing Native youth in urban public schools and highlights inspiring solutions already being implemented in communities across the country. Our latest webinar covers the Native Urban Indian Family Coalition's Resurgence: Restructuring Urban American Indian Education to understand how to scale up these promising alternatives.

Featuring Janeen Comenote, Executive Director of the National Urban Indian Family Coalition (NUIFC) and Dr. Joe Hobot, President and CEO of the American Indian OIC, this webinar is a useful introduction for those new to issues affecting Native youth, and also provided new data and tools for experienced activists and advocates.

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