National

The Color of School Closures

Mass school closings have become a hallmark of today's dominant education policy agenda. But rather than helping students, these closures disrupt whole communities. And as U.S. Department of Education data suggests, the most recent rounds of mass closings in Chicago, New York City, and Philadelphia disproportionately hurt Black and low-income students.

Mass school closings have become a hallmark of today's dominant education policy agenda. But rather than helping students, these closures disrupt whole communities. And as U.S. Department of Education data suggests, the most recent rounds of mass closings in Chicago, New York City and Philadelphia disproportionately hurt Black and low-income students. 

What can you do to end these discriminatory and unacceptable school closures?

Keeping Kids in Class: Arkansas Ally Releases In-Depth Analysis of School Discipline

Black students in Arkansas schools are more likely to be suspended and receive corporal punishment than their white counterparts, according to this comprehensive state-level analysis from Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families (AACF), a member of the AR OTL Campaign. School disciplinary policies that disproportionately keep students of color out of school reduce their opportunities to learn and increase gaps in educational achievement. As this report shows, Arkansas schools rely far too often on disciplinary approaches that bar students from the classroom.

Black students in Arkansas schools are more likely to be suspended and receive corporal punishment than their White counterparts, according to a new report from Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families (AACF), a member of the AR OTL Campaign.

An Arkansas Student Bill of Rights

Students and teachers shouldn't be held accountable to high-stakes test scores and grades unless they have the resources they need meet those standards. "An Arkansas Student Bill of Rights" calls for the state government to be held accountable for providing all students with the resources and opportunities they need to succeed. 

Accountability should go both ways. Students and teachers shouldn't be held accountable to high-stakes test scores and grades unless they have the resources they need meet those standards. Which means that state governments should be held to account for providing high-quality resources and opportunities for all children, regardless of where they live. 

SOTU: The Commander-in-Chief — and the Battle for Public Education

During Tuesday night's State of the Union Address, President Obama touched on education issues at several points in his speech. The Schott Foundation for Public Education today released its response to the President's education message.

 During Tuesday night's State of the Union Address, President Obama touched on education issues at several points in his speech. The Schott Foundation for Public Education today released its response to the President's education message:

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In the absence of dropout factories

By Michael Holzman, Senior Research Consultant, The Schott Foundation for Public Education

Robert Balfanz and his colleagues have drawn our attention to high schools where nearly half of students do not graduate with their peers.  The enrollment in these schools is overwhelmingly Black and Hispanic, and the concentration of Black students in urban drop-out factories is a significant contributor to the nation’s low educational attainment for male Black students and the wide achievement gap between these most vulnerable students and others.

Robert Balfanz and his colleagues have drawn our attention to high schools where nearly half of students do not graduate with their peers.  The enrollment in these schools is overwhelmingly Black and Hispanic, and the concentration of Black students in urban drop-out factories is a significant contributor to the nation’s low educational attainment for male Black students and the wide achievement gap between these most vulnerable students and others.

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A diagnosis and a prescription

By Michael Holzman, Senior Research Consultant, The Schott Foundation for Public Education

A Texas superintendent's diagnosis is that our relatively poor educational outcomes and large gaps in achievement are rooted in socioeconomic inequity; that if attention is paid to curing that problem, the schools will be able to do the rest. Meanwhile, a New York Times article highlights how the military's schools seem to have figured out a way to equalize the playing field for students. What seems to be the answer? Small classes, good housing and health care, integration.

There are two items in the press today (Dec. 12) that offer first a diagnosis of the ills of American public schools and then a prescription. 

John Kuhn, the superintendent of a small public school district in Texas, writing in Valerie Strauss’ Washington Post column “The Answer Sheet,” proposes that:

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Schott Foundation honors advocates of equity in public education

In just a few weeks, the Schott Foundation for Public Education will honor several extraordinary education leaders from around the nation at its 2011 National Opportunity to Learn Education Summit in Washington, D.C. The summit, “Uniting Communities for Education Justice and Action,” will be an exciting gathering of philanthropic leaders, state and federal policymakers, education reform advocates and youth activists from across the country. There's still time to register and join us!

In just a few weeks, the Schott Foundation for Public Education will honor several extraordinary education leaders during its Hot Schott Awards Gala at its 2011 National Opportunity to Learn Education Summit in Washington, D.C., Dec. 8-10 at the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel.

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Webinar: Lift Us Up, Don't Push Us Out! Stories About Organizing Against the School-to-Prison Pipeline

Publication Date: 
Tue, 2018-12-11

The new book Lift Us Up, Don't Push Us Out! features voices from the frontlines of a growing movement for educational justice across the United States. Organizers and activists recount their journeys to movement building, lift up victories and successes, and offer practical organizing strategies and community-based alternatives to traditional education reform and privatization schemes.

The new book Lift Us Up, Don't Push Us Out! features voices from the frontlines of a growing movement for educational justice across the United States. Organizers and activists recount their journeys to movement building, lift up victories and successes, and offer practical organizing strategies and community-based alternatives to traditional education reform and privatization schemes.

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What School Funding Advocates Should Learn From Midterm Elections

by Jeff Bryant

At Education Opportunity Network, Jeff Bryant has assembled important updates and lessons for education advocates as we all assess where the 2018 election season leaves us.

At Education Opportunity Network, Jeff Bryant has assembled important updates and lessons for education advocates as we all assess where the 2018 election season leaves us.

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Getting Out the Vote: It’s More than Seats at Stake

by Allison Brown

There is so much at stake this mid-term election. More than 30 million Americans have cast early ballots so far, which has already surpassed 2014 mid-term election early voting, and more are still coming in. Still, on average only about 40% of eligible voters participate in mid-term elections, and even the best case scenarios do not assume turnout this time around will exceed 50%. Garnering much less attention than House and Senate swing seats and Gubernatorial elections, but still of critical importance, are the ballot measures that are up for votes in each state across the country. Here are some examples of state measures on education equity and social justice that provide yet another reason to get out the vote, and to call on your friends and community members to vote as well. There is too much at stake to sit this election out – the future of our children and their access to healthy living and learning environments where they can succeed depends on us.

There is so much at stake this mid-term election. Organizers, activists and candidates alike have been focused more than ever on Get Out the Vote efforts, knowing that turnout will be the deciding factor in many tight races.

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