Massachusetts

Boston Can Do More to Recruit and Retain Educators of Color

By Roxanne Longoria, Boston NAACP and Boston Youth Service Network

The Boston Public Schools District has over 83% students of color, yet only 37% of its teachers are teachers of color. Building on the committment of district officials to cultivate teacher diversity, BPS must do more to achieve the goal of having a teaching force that reflects the students and citizens of Boston. 

This post is the fourth in a series that features testimony from a hearing hosted by Boston City Councilor Tito Jackson on ways to recruit and retain more teachers of color in Boston Public Schools. Read the first post, written by Councilor Jackson, here. Read the second post, written by Dr.

Room for Improvement in MA with Pre-k, Wraparound Services and College Prep

As part of its annual Condition of Education in the Commonwealth report, the Rennie Center for Education Research & Policy has outlined three ways Massachusetts can build on its already strong education system to better prepare students for school, support them while they're there, and help them make the transition to college or a career.

Massachusetts' schools are consistently ranked among the best in the nation. The state's success is due in large part to its 1993 Education Reform Act, which introduced a set of high achievement standards and a fair school funding system to provide schools with the resources to help students meet those standards.

More Latino Teachers Will Help More Latino Students Succeed

By Samuel Acevedo, Boston Higher Education Resource Center

"If we know that more Latino teachers means more Latino kids will finish school, go on to college and live to their fullest potential, then we are duty bound to hire more of them." This post is the third in a series featuring testimony from a recent hearing hosted by Boston City Councilor Tito Jackson on how Boston Public Schools can recruit, train and retain more teachers of color.

This post is the third in a series that features testimony from a recent hearing hosted by Boston City Councilor Tito Jackson on ways to recruit and retain more teachers of color in Boston Public Schools. Read the first post, written by Councilor Jackson, here. Read the second post, written by Dr.

MA Charter Schools Suspend Far More Students Than Public Schools

According to a new report from the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights and Economic Justice, 9 out of the 10 school systems in Massachusetts with the highest suspension rates are charter schools, with some of them suspending between 40 and 60 percent of their students often for minor misbehaviors like dress code violations or being tardy.

Charter schools in Massachusetts, particularly those in Boston, suspend students at far higher rates than traditional public schools.

Boston Youth Organizers Win Pilot Program for Subway Pass

Thanks to the hard work of youth organizers in Boston over the past year, starting next summer, Boston will launch a pilot program to offer discounted subway and bus passes to students and help make transportation to and from school more affordable.


Photo via Boston Magazine

Getting to school shouldn't depend on whether or not you can afford a subway pass. Thanks to the hard work of youth organizers in Boston, the city will launch a pilot program next summer to offer discounted subway and bus passes to students. 

How To Give Every Student Extended Day, After School and Summer Learning Programs

Want more after-school or summer programs in your district? Well here's what it would probably cost to make that happen. The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center has released a policy brief outlining the costs of expanded learning opportunities and how we can make them available to each and every student.

Want more after-school or summer programs in your district? Well here's what it would probably cost to make that happen.

Regarding teachers of color: Boston Public Schools system is set to lead once again

Tito Jackson, Boston City Councilor

In this interconnected world all children, and particularly those who stand at the margins, need a diverse teaching force if they are going to be able to be competitive globally. I’m glad to report that a seemingly contentious hearing yielded a true partnership between Boston Public Schools, local community members, researchers, and myself and colleague City Councilor Ayanna Pressley to create and implement an accountability structure that ensures we recruit, support, and, most importantly, retain highly qualified teachers of color.

This post originally appeared on the Hechinger Report and is reprinted here with permission of Councilor Jackson. The post is the first in a series that will feature testimony from a recent hearing hosted by Councilor Jackson on ways to recruit and retain more teachers of color in Boston Public Schools. Read the second post, written by Dr.

MA Senate Votes 'No' on Charter Expansion

In a testament to the many parents, students and teachers who have been educating the public and policymakers about the potential consequences of charter school expansion, the Massachusetts State Senate voted to not lift a cap on the number of charter schools in the state.

MA Charter Cap Vote
Photo via Youth on Board

Across the nation, charter schools aren't short on supporters, which is why it came as a surprise in July when the Massachusetts State Senate voted to not lift a cap on the number of charter schools in the state.

Putting a Price Tag on Expanding Opportunity

The Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center and the Rennie Center for Education Research and Policy have launched a new project to put a firm price tag on what it would take to finally close the opportunity gap gap and ensure all students have the resources and opportunities they need to succeed

Massachusetts routinely leads the nation in test scores and high school graduation rates. But the state isn't immune to the same opportunity gaps (and resulting achievement gaps) that hinder students across the country, particularly students of color and students from low-income communities.

Lynn Community Takes Stand for Immigrant Students

The small city of Lynn, MA, has become a local hotspot in the national immigration debate. On July 22, dozens of local parents, students and community members rallied on the steps of Lynn City Hall to protest city officials trying to scapegoat young immigrant students for the ails of a long-underfunded school system.

For education advocates and organizers, the small city of Lynn, MA, (just a short drive north of Boston) has become a local hotspot in the national immigration debate.

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