Louisiana

Curbing Harsh Discipline in New Orleans Schools

Great news for school discipline activists in New Orleans! The Recovery School District, which oversees many of the city's schools, will soon begin curbing harsh discipline policies in all its schools, including charters, by limiting the number of offenses for which students can be expelled. 

Great news for school discipline activists in New Orleans! The Recovery School District, which oversees many of the city's schools, will soon begin curbing harsh discipline policies in all its schools, including charters, by limiting the number of offenses for which students can be expelled. 

State: 

LA Kids Not As Excited By Vouchers As Media Thinks

How's this for school choice? Of the hundreds of thousands of eligible Louisiana students who could have applied to the state's new voucher program ( which is backed by Gov. Bobby Jindal), 98 percent of them elected not to apply for a voucher. 

Louisiana's new state voucher program, which is set to begin in August and is backed by Gov. Bobby Jindal, has gotten the green light to start accepting applications, despite opposition from education advocates, parents, local school boards and teachers unions. A judged refused to delay the program this week even as a lawsuit brought by the school boards and unions winds its way up through the court system. 

State: 

Southern States Get Failing Grade for School Funding Fairness

Southern states are doing a particularly unfair job providing their students with educational resources and opportunities. A recent report from the Education Law Center, "Is School Funding Fair? A National Report Card," provides statistics and analysis of the fairness of school funding formulas for every state. The Institute for Southern Studies has examined the data further and says that Southern states have some serious work to do in order to ensure every student has a fair opportunity to learn. 

Fairness in school funding is more than lacking across the country. Southern states are doing a particularly unfair job providing their students with educational resources and opportunities. A recent report from the Education Law Center, "Is School Funding Fair? A National Report Card," provides statistics and analysis of the fairness of school funding formulas for every state.

Do Failures in Justice or Education System Increase Incarceration Rates?

Michael Holzman, Senior Research Consultant, Schott Foundation for Public Education

Higher graduation rates typically correlate to lower incarceration rates. Why then do states with higher graduation rates for students of color also witness higher rates of incarceration for the same population? Because our criminal justice system, and the school-to-prison pipeline, disproportionately affects students of color. 

Much of the literature on education and prison -- and "the school to prison pipeline" -- assumes a negative correlation between educational achievement and incarceration: the more highly educated a person, the less chance that he (it is usually he) will be incarcerated.

This belief is supported by data for male White, non-Latinos:

LA Is "Worst State" in Ed Reform

Diane Ravitch thinks Louisiana might just make the cut as the "worst state in the nation" in terms of its commitment (or lack thereof) to fostering a strong public education system that serves the needs of all students.

Diane Ravitch thinks Louisiana might just make the cut as the "worst state in the nation" in terms of its commitment (or lack thereof) to fostering a strong public education system that serves the needs of all students. From her blog

State: 

National Report Card: Is School Funding Fair?

Far too many states continue to deny public schools the essential resources they need to provide every child with a fair and substantive opportunity to learn. The Second Edition of Education Law Center's Is School Funding Fair? A National Report Card rates the 50 states on the basis of four "fairness indicators" - funding level, funding distribution, state fiscal effort, and public school coverage - and provides the most in-depth analysis to date of state education finance systems.

Far too many states continue to deny public schools the essential resources they need to provide every child with a fair and substantive opportunity to learn. The Second Edition of Education Law Center's Is School Funding Fair?

Is School Funding Fair? A National Report Card (Second Edition)

Publication Date: 
Fri, 2012-06-22
Author: 
Education Law Center
Type: 
reports
Category: 
equitable-instructional-materials

The Second Edition of the National Report Card on public school funding, Is School Funding Fair?, shows that far too many states continue to deny public schools the essential resources they need to meet the needs of the nation's 53 million students and to boost academic achievement. The National Report Card rates the 50 states on the basis of four "fairness indicators" - funding level, funding distribution, state fiscal effort, and public school coverage. The Report provides the most in-depth analysis to date of state education finance systems and school funding fairness across the nation. How does your state measure up? 

Why New Orleans's Charters Aren't National Model

What with New Orleans's massive charter school experiment routinely being hailed by proponents of corporate-style education reform as the new model for urban education, its refreshing to see a media story that digs into the evidence on why those charters should not, in fact, be models of reform. 

What with New Orleans's massive charter school experiment routinely being hailed by proponents of corporate-style education reform as the new model for urban education, its refreshing to see a media story that digs into the evidence on why those charters should not, in fact, be models of reform. 

State: 

"Jindal Law" Will Completely Dismantle LA Public Ed

The passage of the "Jindal Law" in Louisiana is bad news for public education, equitable funding and quality teaching. It will drastically expand the state's voucher program and the number of charter schools, will institute a parent trigger mechanism and will remove teacher tenure.

The passage of a new education "reform" bill in Louisiana has put the state at the forefront of marketplace education policy reform. The "Jindal Law," named for Gov. Bobby Jindal, will drastically expand the state's voucher program and the number of charter schools, will institute a parent trigger mechanism and will remove teacher tenure. In other words, the bill is bad news for public schools, equitable funding and quality teaching. 

State: 

Exclusionary Zoning Denies Poor Access to Quality Schools

New Study: It costs almost $11,000 more per year to live near high-quality schools than low-quality schools. This "housing cost gap," which is the result of exclusionary zoning policies, means that low-income students are less likely to attend good schools, thereby denying them access to the educational opportunities they need to succeed and escape poverty. 

It's a big week for studies focused the relationship between location and educational opportunity: First, the Schott Foundation's report on education redlining in New York City public schools that revealed city policies and practices systematically deny educational opportunities to the districts and schools with high percentages of poor and students of color.

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