District of Columbia

The Color of School Closures

Mass school closings have become a hallmark of today's dominant education policy agenda. But rather than helping students, these closures disrupt whole communities. And as U.S. Department of Education data suggests, the most recent rounds of mass closings in Chicago, New York City, and Philadelphia disproportionately hurt Black and low-income students.

Mass school closings have become a hallmark of today's dominant education policy agenda. But rather than helping students, these closures disrupt whole communities. And as U.S. Department of Education data suggests, the most recent rounds of mass closings in Chicago, New York City and Philadelphia disproportionately hurt Black and low-income students. 

What can you do to end these discriminatory and unacceptable school closures?

Want some good news? Here are 10 inspiring victories by grantee partners in 2017

In many ways 2017 seemed like a never-ending stream of bad news and attacks on public education. However, advocates kept up the good fight and the movement for education justice saw growth and increased capacity. Thanks to our grantee partners and allies working tirelessly in communities across the country, we’d like to share some good news! In no particular order, here are the top 10 policy wins our grantee partners helped secure. These victories give us hope for 2018 and reinforce the idea that positive change in public education starts at the grassroots.

In many ways 2017 seemed like a never-ending stream of bad news and attacks on public education. However, advocates kept up the good fight and the movement for education justice saw growth and increased capacity. Thanks to our grantee partners and allies working tirelessly in communities across the country, we’d like to share some good news!

Using Storytelling and Social Media to Change the Education Conversation

Patrick St. John, Creative & Online Communications Director

A few weeks ago, I was honored to speak on a panel and workshop at the 70th Annual Education Writers Association National Seminar in Washington, DC, on social media and storytelling.

With me were Virginia Tech biologist Anne Hilborn, the Woodrow Wilson Foundation's Patrick Riccards (better known as EduFlack), and NPR Ed Team reporter Cory Turner. We were moderated by Virginia Tech’s Cathy Grimes and the Learning Policy Institute’s Barbara McKenna.

Public education policy has a reputation for being both contentious and wonky, which is why finding new ways to connect researchers, journalists, policymakers, advocates, and community members is key to moving from debate to action. We were lucky enough to secure a two-session block, so we were able to answer many questions from the more than fifty audience members in attendance and really dive deep into storytelling, social media strategy, and case studies of these ideas operating in the education space.

A lot was covered, so I’ll focus on a few key takeaways discussed:

A few weeks ago, I was honored to speak on a panel and workshop at the 70th Annual Education Writers Association National Seminar in Washington, DC, on social media and storytelling.

Is school funding fair? For too many students, the answer is still no.

Since 2010, the Education Law Center has published national report cards on how states are (or aren't) investing in their schools and students. "Is School Funding Fair? A National Report Card" released Wednesday, paints a worrying picture. In most states, ELC has found that public funding for schools is both unfair and inequitable: that is, not only are schools not receiving the funds they need, the schools that need funding the most are the ones with the most dramatic shortfalls.

Like Our Infographics? Watch Journey for Justice in Action

Parents, students and teachers across the country are fighting for equitable school resources, community solutions and an end to mass school closures. If you like our infographics on school closures, don't miss this video from our grassroots ally Journey for Justice.

Parents, students and teachers across the country are fighting for equitable school resources, community solutions and an end to mass school closures. If you've been following our series of infographics on school closures, you know that closures disproportionately affect students of color and students from low-income families.

Mass School Closures Are "Shock Doctrine" for Education

Mass school closures are the "shock doctrine" of the education world. But parents, students, teachers and communities are fighting back to ensure their public schools receive the investments and supports they need to succeed.

When 9-year-old Asean Johnson gave his now-famous, fiery speech last spring at a rally to protest the mass closure of 49 Chicago public schools, he drew enough national attention that his school, at least, was spared.

Debunking the Myths of School Closures

Education officials use a variety of justifications to defend the closures, citing everything from budget concerns to promises of better opportunities for students. But as this new infographic from the OTL Campaign illustrates, these justifications don’t hold up to scrutiny. Here's what the evidence from past and current school closures says.

In cities across the country, education officials are closing public schools en masse, impacting thousands of students, disproportionately those from communities of color or low-income families. Officials use a variety of justifications to defend the closures, citing everything from budget concerns to promises of better opportunities for students. But as this new infographic from the OTL Campaign illustrates, these justifications don’t hold up to scrutiny.

The School-to-Prison Pipeline

Publication Date: 
Thu, 2013-07-11
Type: 
graphs-visuals
Category: 
equitable-instructional-materials

This infographic from the Advancement Project details how schools criminalize students and push them down the school-to-prison pipeline through the use of harsh, zero-tolerance discipline policies. The infographic was released ahead of the Advancement Project's national convening, "We Can Do Better: Collaborating to Reform School Discipline and Accountability." Download full infographic below. 

This infographic from the Advancement Project details how schools criminalize students and push them down the school-to-prison pipeline through the use of harsh, zero-tolerance discipline policies. The infographic was released ahead of the Advancement Project's national convening, "We Can Do Better: Collaborating to Reform School Discipline and Accountability." Download full infographic below. 

2013 KIDS COUNT Data Book

Publication Date: 
Tue, 2013-07-09
Author: 
Annie E. Casey Foundation
Type: 
reports
Category: 
early-care-education

The 2013 KIDS COUNT Data Book provides a detailed picture of how children are faring in the United States. In addition to ranking states on overall child well-being, the Data Book ranks states in four domains: Economic Well-Being, Education, Health, and Family and Community.

An Education Declaration to Rebuild America

Every revolution needs a declaration. Against a backdrop of surging grassroots discontent with how the nation's K-12 public schools are currently governed, a diverse coalition of leaders from across the country have joined in support of "An Education Declaration to Rebuild America."

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Diverse Education Network Rejects 30 Years of Failed Policy,
Calls for New Direction Based on Research, Equity & Supports

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