Connecticut

National Report Card: Is School Funding Fair?

Far too many states continue to deny public schools the essential resources they need to provide every child with a fair and substantive opportunity to learn. The Second Edition of Education Law Center's Is School Funding Fair? A National Report Card rates the 50 states on the basis of four "fairness indicators" - funding level, funding distribution, state fiscal effort, and public school coverage - and provides the most in-depth analysis to date of state education finance systems.

Far too many states continue to deny public schools the essential resources they need to provide every child with a fair and substantive opportunity to learn. The Second Edition of Education Law Center's Is School Funding Fair?

Is School Funding Fair? A National Report Card (Second Edition)

Publication Date: 
Fri, 2012-06-22
Author: 
Education Law Center
Type: 
reports
Category: 
equitable-instructional-materials

The Second Edition of the National Report Card on public school funding, Is School Funding Fair?, shows that far too many states continue to deny public schools the essential resources they need to meet the needs of the nation's 53 million students and to boost academic achievement. The National Report Card rates the 50 states on the basis of four "fairness indicators" - funding level, funding distribution, state fiscal effort, and public school coverage. The Report provides the most in-depth analysis to date of state education finance systems and school funding fairness across the nation. How does your state measure up? 

Let's Commit to Equalizing Educational Opportunity!

Severing the link between school finance and local property taxes would help to eliminate the funding inequities that plague our schools and that deprive low-income students of the resources and opportunities they need to succeed. In the Sunday Dialogue section in the New York Times, Dr. John H. Jackson, President and CEO of the Schott Foundation for Public Education, argues for a more just method for funding our nation's schools.

In the Sunday Dialogue section in the New York Times, Dr. John H. Jackson, President and CEO of the Schott Foundation for Public Education, argues for a more just method for funding our nation's schools.

Education For All Is a "Moral Imperative"

Providing every child with a fair and substantive opportunity to learn is nothing less than a moral imperative. But as parent and student organizers across the country know all too well, today's education policies, which push competition and privatization, are not sufficient for "addressing the structural inequities that make separate and unequal education a persistent fact of life in America today," writes Rev. Jesse Jackson in a must-read column for CNN.

Providing every child with a fair and substantive opportunity to learn is nothing less than a moral imperative. But as parent and student organizers across the country know all too well, today's education policies, which push competition and privatization, are not sufficient for "addressing the structural inequities that make separate and unequal education a persistent fact of life in America today," writes Rev. Jesse Jackson in a must-read column for CNN.

Why Education Inequality Persists - And How To Fix It

By John Jackson, President and CEO of the Schott Foundation for Public Education, and Pedro Noguera, the Peter L. Agnew professor of education at New York University

If it takes a village to raise a child, the same village must share accountability when many children are educationally abandoned. In New York City, the nation’s largest school system, on average student outcomes and their opportunity to learn are more determined by the neighborhood where a child lives, than his or her abilities.

The following column was originally posted on The Answer Sheet blog. 

CT Policymakers Ignore Reality of Classroom Inequities

Policymakers in Connecticut are not addressing the real issues of inequitable funding policies and the lack of materials that are plaguing the state's public school. Instead, they are dressing up ineffective education "reform" policies as legitimate solutions to the "persistent and systematic deprivation in our neediest schools." 

Wouldn't it be great if states took a few minutes to consider that struggling schools might be struggling not because of bad teachers or poor administration, but because of poor policies that deny those schools the resources they need to effectively teach their students? In CT that looks like it might be too much to hope for.

State: 

Exclusionary Zoning Denies Poor Access to Quality Schools

New Study: It costs almost $11,000 more per year to live near high-quality schools than low-quality schools. This "housing cost gap," which is the result of exclusionary zoning policies, means that low-income students are less likely to attend good schools, thereby denying them access to the educational opportunities they need to succeed and escape poverty. 

It's a big week for studies focused the relationship between location and educational opportunity: First, the Schott Foundation's report on education redlining in New York City public schools that revealed city policies and practices systematically deny educational opportunities to the districts and schools with high percentages of poor and students of color.

Education Policy Must Focus on Ensuring Equity

The more we focus on testing and market-based reforms, the less we'll be able to learn and replicate from countries like Finland. Equity is a central component Finnish education policy. It isn't in the U.S. 

With all the attention Finland has been getting in recent years, you might wonder why we can't just replicate what the Finns are doing and - PRESTO! - fix all the woes of the U.S. education system.

2020 Vision Roadmap: A Pre-K Through Postsecondary Roadmap for Educational Success

Publication Date: 
Wed, 2012-04-11
Author: 
National Opportunity to Learn Campaign
Type: 
policy
Category: 
equitable-instructional-materials

In 2010, the President set a goal for the U.S. to become the global leader in postsecondary degree attainment by the year 2020. Yet, more than 7,000 students, many of whom are not proficient in reading and math, are leaving or being pushed out of U.S. schools each day. This study shows that the U.S. cannot achieve the President’s 2020 goal if our schools continue to hemorrhage large segments of our nation’s youth. Accordingly, this document is designed to serve as a blueprint for implementing a comprehensive package of policy reforms that seek to increase the quantity of students who succeed at every stage of the educational pipeline and the quality of the education they receive. Different from most calls for reform, it considers the educational pipeline in its entirety—from early childhood through postsecondary attainment—and offers evidence‐informed strategies to boost access, quantity and quality at every stage.

The State of Preschool 2011

Publication Date: 
Tue, 2012-04-10
Author: 
National Institute for Early Education Research
Type: 
reports
Category: 
early-care-education

This report from the National Institute for Early Education Research analyzes national and state statistics and trends on the availabilty of quality Pre-K programs across the country. The report includes detailed state profiles that measure not just access access to early education opportunities but also whether available Pre-K programs meet a set of 10 benchmarks for quality. 

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