Wraparound student supports

CT Policymakers Ignore Reality of Classroom Inequities

Policymakers in Connecticut are not addressing the real issues of inequitable funding policies and the lack of materials that are plaguing the state's public school. Instead, they are dressing up ineffective education "reform" policies as legitimate solutions to the "persistent and systematic deprivation in our neediest schools." 

Wouldn't it be great if states took a few minutes to consider that struggling schools might be struggling not because of bad teachers or poor administration, but because of poor policies that deny those schools the resources they need to effectively teach their students? In CT that looks like it might be too much to hope for.

State: 

Education Redlining in New York City

New Report: In New York City public schools, a student's education outcomes and opportunity to learn are statistically more determined by where he or she lives than their abilities, according to a new report, A Rotting Apple: Education Redlining in New York City

Every child has a right to a quality education. But in New York City, our nation's largest public school district, access to educational opportunities is increasingly restricted to certain neighborhoods and communities, denying hundreds of thousands of children the chance they need to succeed.

Report Shows Need for Equitable Funding and Policies in NYC

The Schott Foundation report on education redlining in NYC schools illustrates the dire need for more equity in city education policy. David Sciarra, Executive Director of Education Law Center, shares his thoughts on the report. 

Below is a statement from Education Law Center in response to the new Schott Foundation report on education redlining in New York City (download here). ELC is a longtime advocate of education justice and equitable educational opportunity.

Education Policy Must Focus on Ensuring Equity

The more we focus on testing and market-based reforms, the less we'll be able to learn and replicate from countries like Finland. Equity is a central component Finnish education policy. It isn't in the U.S. 

With all the attention Finland has been getting in recent years, you might wonder why we can't just replicate what the Finns are doing and - PRESTO! - fix all the woes of the U.S. education system.

Cookies for Education: Mock Bake Sale in Protest of Education Cuts

It would take roughly 343,561,144 cookies sold at a school bake sale to pay for $171,780,572 cuts in school budgets in Southwestern Pennsylvania, says the group Tell Everyone All Cuts Hurt (TEACH), which held a mock back sale to protest cuts to the state's education budget. 

Pop quiz:

How many cookies (price: 50 cents) would you have to sell to pay for the $171,780,572 cuts in school budgets in Southwestern Pennsylvania? 

State: 

The Way Forward: From Sanctions to Support

Publication Date: 
Tue, 2012-04-17
Author: 
The Working Group on School Transformation
Type: 
policy
Category: 
equitable-instructional-materials

This policy brief from the New York City Working Group on School Transformation criticizes NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg's education reform strategy of closing low-performing schools. Evidence from the NYC Department of Education reveals that its school-assignment policies concentrate the highest-needs students in struggling schools, exacerbating the low performance that leads to the subsequent closing of these schools. The brief calls for the DOE to build the instructional capacity across NYC public schools to support the lowest-performing schools rather than simply closing them. 

A Rotting Apple: Education Redlining in New York City

Publication Date: 
Tue, 2012-04-17
Author: 
The Schott Foundation for Public Education
Type: 
reports
Category: 
equitable-instructional-materials

In New York City public schools, a student's chances for educational success are more often determined by where he or she lives than their abilities. The city's education policies and practices have resulted in an inequitable distribution of educational resources that intensifies the impact of poverty and denies certain students a meaningful education. Similar to the "redlining" banking practices that once denied investments to communities of color, the education landscape today effectively redlines students of color and low-income students from the resources they need to succeed.

2020 Vision Roadmap: A Pre-K Through Postsecondary Roadmap for Educational Success

Publication Date: 
Wed, 2012-04-11
Author: 
National Opportunity to Learn Campaign
Type: 
policy
Category: 
equitable-instructional-materials

In 2010, the President set a goal for the U.S. to become the global leader in postsecondary degree attainment by the year 2020. Yet, more than 7,000 students, many of whom are not proficient in reading and math, are leaving or being pushed out of U.S. schools each day. This study shows that the U.S. cannot achieve the President’s 2020 goal if our schools continue to hemorrhage large segments of our nation’s youth. Accordingly, this document is designed to serve as a blueprint for implementing a comprehensive package of policy reforms that seek to increase the quantity of students who succeed at every stage of the educational pipeline and the quality of the education they receive. Different from most calls for reform, it considers the educational pipeline in its entirety—from early childhood through postsecondary attainment—and offers evidence‐informed strategies to boost access, quantity and quality at every stage.

More Kids in Pre-K, But Less Per-Student Funding

According to a new report, Pre-K enrollment has doubled in the U.S. over the past ten years. But because of budget cuts, state per-child spending for Pre-K programs has decreased dramatically. 

The good news: More students than ever are enrolled in Pre-K programs in the U.S. The bad news: The rising number of Pre-K students coupled with state education budget cuts across the country has drastically reduced per-child spending on Pre-K programs.  

Wisconsin Needs to Stop Digging the Hole Deeper

By Thomas Beebe, Project Director, Opportunity to Learn - Wisconsin

For far too long the problems of fewer resources and a dysfunctional funding system have plagued our children. Politicians have nibbled at the edges and made excuses. What is now clear is that it isn’t a case of not being able to do what is right for children. It is a case of not wanting to─whether because of a lack of courage, not enough knowledge, or an abundance of politics.

Opportunity to Learn-Wisconsin settled into the United Way of Dane County headquarters in Madison recently to talk about the future of public education in the state. As thousands of Wisconsinites before them, the education advocates at the converence came to the conclusion that sound schools and educated children are the basis of thriving communities and great futures for all of us.

State: 

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