Wraparound student supports

Loving Cities Index

Publication Date: 
Wed, 2018-02-21
Type: 
reports
As racism and hate continue to dominate the national dialogue, the Schott Foundation for Public Education released the Loving Cities Index, a multi-state report that aims to reverse historical local policies and practices rooted in racism and bias and replace them with policies that create local loving systems from birth and promote an opportunity to learn and thrive.

As racism and hate continue to dominate the national dialogue, the Schott Foundation for Public Education released the Loving Cities Index, a multi-state report that aims to reverse historical local policies and practices rooted in racism and bias and replace them with policies that create local loving systems from birth and promote an opportunity to learn and thrive.

The Color of School Closures

Mass school closings have become a hallmark of today's dominant education policy agenda. But rather than helping students, these closures disrupt whole communities. And as U.S. Department of Education data suggests, the most recent rounds of mass closings in Chicago, New York City, and Philadelphia disproportionately hurt Black and low-income students.

Mass school closings have become a hallmark of today's dominant education policy agenda. But rather than helping students, these closures disrupt whole communities. And as U.S. Department of Education data suggests, the most recent rounds of mass closings in Chicago, New York City and Philadelphia disproportionately hurt Black and low-income students. 

What can you do to end these discriminatory and unacceptable school closures?

Keeping Kids in Class: Arkansas Ally Releases In-Depth Analysis of School Discipline

Black students in Arkansas schools are more likely to be suspended and receive corporal punishment than their white counterparts, according to this comprehensive state-level analysis from Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families (AACF), a member of the AR OTL Campaign. School disciplinary policies that disproportionately keep students of color out of school reduce their opportunities to learn and increase gaps in educational achievement. As this report shows, Arkansas schools rely far too often on disciplinary approaches that bar students from the classroom.

Black students in Arkansas schools are more likely to be suspended and receive corporal punishment than their White counterparts, according to a new report from Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families (AACF), a member of the AR OTL Campaign.

"What to Expect When You're Expecting Budget Cuts"

Wisconsin Superintendent Tony Evers met with educators, students, parents, and community members in Milwaukee to discuss “what to expect when you’re expecting more budget cuts.” He stressed the "three R's of fair funding" (reinvesting, reforming and restoring) and said that until the state prioritizes children and begins reinvesting in their education, the economy will remain sluggish.

The following post was written by Thomas Beebe, Project Manager for Opportunity to Learn - Wisconsin. The post was originally published on the Wisconsin Alliance for Excellent Schools website, and is reprinted here with his permission. 

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Department of Public Instruction Superintendent Tony Evers was in Milwaukee, Sept. 26, to discuss with educators, students, parents, and community members “what to expect when you’re expecting more budget cuts.”

State: 

An Arkansas Student Bill of Rights

Students and teachers shouldn't be held accountable to high-stakes test scores and grades unless they have the resources they need meet those standards. "An Arkansas Student Bill of Rights" calls for the state government to be held accountable for providing all students with the resources and opportunities they need to succeed. 

Accountability should go both ways. Students and teachers shouldn't be held accountable to high-stakes test scores and grades unless they have the resources they need meet those standards. Which means that state governments should be held to account for providing high-quality resources and opportunities for all children, regardless of where they live. 

SOTU: The Commander-in-Chief — and the Battle for Public Education

During Tuesday night's State of the Union Address, President Obama touched on education issues at several points in his speech. The Schott Foundation for Public Education today released its response to the President's education message.

 During Tuesday night's State of the Union Address, President Obama touched on education issues at several points in his speech. The Schott Foundation for Public Education today released its response to the President's education message:

State: 

Denver Rising: A Loving School System agenda aims to reverse racial inequity

This weekend, Our Voice Our Schools coalition is gathering a group of community practitioners and activists to come together at Denver University and align around a comprehensive agenda for education justice in Denver. The goal of the event: to move from 'talk' to action by creating a comprehensive Loving School System agenda that highlights the systemic changes and investments needed to truly provide Black children in Denver their right to free, high-quality public education.

This weekend, Our Voice Our Schools coalition is gathering a group of community practitioners and activists to come together at Denver University and align around a comprehensive agenda for education justice in Denver. The goal of the event: to move from talk to action by creating a comprehensive Loving School System agenda that highlights the systemic changes and investments needed to truly provide Black children in Denver their right to free, high-quality public education.

"Love & Happiness" - Dr. John H. Jackson on Loving Systems

Publication Date: 
Fri, 2018-10-05

Schott Foundation President & CEO Dr. John H. Jackson talks about the importance of love and happiness as we work give students the opportunities they need.

Schott Foundation President & CEO Dr. John H. Jackson talks about the importance of love and happiness as we work give students the opportunities they need.

State: 

We ALL Deserve a Vote

Allison Brown
In the 2016 presidential election, only 58% of eligible voters went to the polls, meaning almost half of people that could vote, either were not able to or chose not to. Addressing massive gaps in voter registration and voter turnout is critical to ensuring all economically marginalized voters are represented, and when everyone’s voice is represented at the polls, policies are put in place that actually lead to measurable decreases in income inequality. So, how can we remove voting barriers? And what is the federal government's role in protecting our sacred right to vote?

It’s election season again. And with that comes a barrage of PSA’s and famous people reiterating that the most important thing you can do is vote. Yet, in the 2016 presidential election only 58% of eligible voters went to the polls. Only 58 percent!

State: 

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