Fair and Just School Climate

Across the country, we're working with our grantees for educational justice

The Schott Foundation has been having an exciting few weeks of travelling around the country to share ideas, meet allied organizations, and see the work and future planes of our grantees highlighted in a variety of forums and conferences. It’s been great to see innovative and important conversations happening, and we’re glad to share with you some of the highlights!

Why Arkansas?

by Cassie Schwerner, Senior Vice President of National Partnerships and Ellen Meltzer, Vice President of Strategic Initiatives

Why Arkansas? Four years ago, in February 2012, the Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation (WRF) first posed that invitation as a question to fellow funders from across the country. In response, WRF hosted a statewide tour demonstrating to participants Arkansas’ readiness for education reform and investment.

The tour moved funders and advocates, including the Schott Foundation for Pubic Education, to create a full-fledged campaign. Initiated in 2012, the Arkansas Opportunity to Learn (AR OTL) Campaign unites disparate and distinct education advocacy organizations and grassroots groups. They all share a common goal: achieving education policy reforms that benefit all Arkansas students.

Bill Kopsky, Executive Director of the Arkansas Public Policy Panel, speaks to assembled participants.

Why Arkansas? Four years ago, in February 2012, the Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation (WRF) first posed that invitation as a question to fellow funders from across the country. In response, WRF hosted a statewide tour demonstrating to participants Arkansas’ readiness for education reform and investment.

State: 

Student rights? There's an app for that.

Schott's Senior Vice President of National Partnerships, Cassie Schwerner, was so impressed with Youth on Board’s new Boston Student Rights app – the first of its kind in the country – she decided to talk with staff and student leaders to learn more about it. Here, she chats with Carlos Rojas, Education Policy Organizer for Youth on Board (YOB).

CASSIE SCHWERNER: Why did young people, youth organizers, in the Boston area feel the need to create the Boston Student Rights app?

CARLOS ROJAS: Young people of color, trans youth and others are being criminalized and pushed out of schools. Did you see the video of the police officer in the South Carolina classroom? That sort of violence happens all over. We knew we needed a new organizing tool to help us reach young people in the schools – young people most affected by the school-to-prison-pipeline. But we also knew the tools we had used before, like palm cards and posters, were not practical for many of the situations young people find themselves in. We wanted something that could be immediately on hand when a young person was being confronted by figures of authority, something they would always have access to.

Schott's Senior Vice President of National Partnerships, Cassie Schwerner, was so impressed with Youth on Board’s new Boston Student Rights app – the first of its kind in the country – she decided to talk with staff and student leaders to learn more about it. Here, she chats with Carlos Rojas, Education Policy Organizer for Youth on Board (YOB).

CASSIE SCHWERNER: Why did young people, youth organizers, in the Boston area feel the need to create the Boston Student Rights app?

With Power Comes Responsibility

During President Barack Obama’s eighth and final State of the Union address, the President boldly proclaimed the U.S. as “the most powerful country in the world…by far.” As the leader of the most powerful country in the world, President Obama also assessed one of his biggest regrets: his inability to bring Congress together to reach consensus and make progress on a number of critical issues. President Obama’s proclamations highlight a simple fact that future administrations and Congresses must embrace — with power comes responsibility.  

During President Barack Obama’s eighth and final State of the Union address, the President boldly proclaimed the U.S. as “the most powerful country in the world…by far.” As the leader of the most powerful country in the world, President Obama also assessed one of his biggest regrets: his inability to bring Congress together to reach consensus and make progress on a number of critical issues. President Obama’s proclamations highlight a simple fact that future administrations and Congresses must embrace — with power comes responsibility.  

State: 

Getting from ESSA to Equity

Last week President Obama signed the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) into law, replacing No Child Left Behind as the latest version of the 1965 Elementary and Secondary Education Act. With any bill of this size and scope it defies easy description, and as one would expect given the political climate in Washington, DC, ESSA is a decidedly mixed law with the potential for both positive and negative effects.

Last week President Obama signed the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) into law, replacing No Child Left Behind as the latest version of the 1965 Elementary and Secondary Education Act. With any bill of this size and scope it defies easy description, and as one would expect given the political climate in Washington, DC, ESSA is a decidedly mixed law with the potential for both positive and negative effects.

State: 

Public Education and Black Male Students: The 2004 State Report Card

Publication Date: 
Fri, 2004-10-01
Type: 
reports
This is the 2004 edition of Schott's series of reports on the achievement of Black male students in public education. View the latest report at www.blackboysreport.org.
This is the 2004 edition of Schott's series of reports on the achievement of Black male students in public education. View the latest report at www.blackboysreport.org.
State: 

Public Education and Black Male Students: The 2006 State Report Card

Publication Date: 
Thu, 2006-06-01
Type: 
reports
This is the 2006 edition of Schott's series of reports on the achievement of Black male students in public education. View the latest report at www.blackboysreport.org.
This is the 2006 edition of Schott's series of reports on the achievement of Black male students in public education. View the latest report at www.blackboysreport.org.
State: 

A Positive Future for Black Boys: Building the Movement

Publication Date: 
Fri, 2006-12-01
Type: 
reports
This is a supplemental report to the 2006 edition of Schott's series of reports on the achievement of Black male students in public education. View the latest report at www.blackboysreport.org.
This is a supplemental report to the 2006 edition of Schott's series of reports on the achievement of Black male students in public education. View the latest report at www.blackboysreport.org.
State: 

Yes We Can: The Schott 50 State Report on Public Education and Black Males

Publication Date: 
Sun, 2010-08-01
Type: 
reports
This is the 2010 edition of Schott's series of reports on the achievement of Black male students in public education. View the latest report at www.blackboysreport.org.
This is the 2010 edition of Schott's series of reports on the achievement of Black male students in public education. View the latest report at www.blackboysreport.org.

The Urgency of Now: The Schott 50 State Report on Public Education and Black Males

Publication Date: 
Sat, 2012-09-01
Type: 
reports
This is the 2012 edition of Schott's series of reports on the achievement of Black male students in public education. View the latest report at www.blackboysreport.org.
This is the 2012 edition of Schott's series of reports on the achievement of Black male students in public education. View the latest report at www.blackboysreport.org.
State: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Fair and Just School Climate