Fair and Just School Climate

Keeping Kids in Class: Arkansas Ally Releases In-Depth Analysis of School Discipline

Black students in Arkansas schools are more likely to be suspended and receive corporal punishment than their white counterparts, according to this comprehensive state-level analysis from Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families (AACF), a member of the AR OTL Campaign. School disciplinary policies that disproportionately keep students of color out of school reduce their opportunities to learn and increase gaps in educational achievement. As this report shows, Arkansas schools rely far too often on disciplinary approaches that bar students from the classroom.

Black students in Arkansas schools are more likely to be suspended and receive corporal punishment than their White counterparts, according to a new report from Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families (AACF), a member of the AR OTL Campaign.

SOTU: The Commander-in-Chief — and the Battle for Public Education

During Tuesday night's State of the Union Address, President Obama touched on education issues at several points in his speech. The Schott Foundation for Public Education today released its response to the President's education message.

 During Tuesday night's State of the Union Address, President Obama touched on education issues at several points in his speech. The Schott Foundation for Public Education today released its response to the President's education message:

State: 

Webinar: Building ESSA Plans for Equity and Opportunity

Publication Date: 
Thu, 2017-06-22
The future of our public schools is being determined right now — but do you have a seat at the table? The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), passed in 2015, is being implemented across the country. The ESSA accountability plans that states and districts are setting up now could lead us toward equity and opportunity or push us down the path of privatization and disinvestment.

The future of our public schools is being determined right now — but do you have a seat at the table? The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), passed in 2015, is being implemented across the country. The ESSA accountability plans that states and districts are setting up now could lead us toward equity and opportunity or push us down the path of privatization and disinvestment.

State: 

Investing in Healthy Living and Learning Communities for Native Children and Youth

Due to historical trauma, chronically underfunded programs, and broken promises on the part of the U.S. government, children and youth from Native American communities experience many educational, health, and economic disparities compared with their peers. To raise awareness and challenge the philanthropic community to better resource movements to support healthy living and learning for Native children and youth, the Schott Foundation and Nike’s N7 Fund, in partnership with Native Americans in Philanthropy, convened a group of Native education, health care, and human services experts along with several foundations in Washington, DC, in late June.

Due to historical trauma, chronically underfunded programs, and broken promises on the part of the U.S. government, youth from Native American communities experience many educational, health, and economic disparities compared with their peers in the general population.

State: 

Webinar: Building ESSA Plans for Equity and Opportunity

In June the Schott Foundation hosted a special extended-length webinar diving deep into implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act. While discussing the minutiae of education policy is rarely an exciting activity, the panelists on our webinar showed how important it is that advocates and community members know how ESSA works: the future of our children’s education depends on it.

Download the slides for this webinar here

Tags: 

Are you a Proud #PublicSchoolGrad?

Since their founding, local public schools and their educators have produced America’s most brilliant artists, scientists, doctors, musicians, lawyers, presidents, and more — people from all walks of life, contributing to society in a myriad of ways. The neighborhood public school is often the center of a civic and cultural life, recognized as the key to each community's future. The fate of public schools affect the fate of everyone: it's why they were one of the first institutions built by freed slaves during Reconstruction, and why they were so central to desegregating our towns and cities a century later.

And while the struggle continues to make our public schools more equitable and just for every child, we must also celebrate and protect those aspects that are now under threat by privatization, disinvestment, and resegregation. That's why the Schott Foundation is proud to lift up some of the countless success stories that our public schools produce every year from coast to coast.

Since their founding, local public schools and their educators have produced America’s most brilliant artists, scientists, doctors, musicians, lawyers, presidents, and more — people from all walks of life, contributing to society in a myriad of ways. The neighborhood public school is often the center of a civic and cultural life, recognized as the key to each community's future.

State: 

The War on Black Girls' Hair in Charter and Private Schools

Hair is an integral part of black cultural expression, but it has little to do with educational development, says John H. Jackson, president and CEO of the Schott Foundation. His response, highlighted in recent media reports, was a sharp dressing-down of a charter school in Malden, Mass., that disciplined African American girls who wore braided hair extensions to school. The case brought heightened attention to the boundaries of policing identity, and it activated our advocacy partners at the local ACLU, NAACP, and Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights and Economic Justice to get the school to reconsider its ban on hair extensions, which overwhelmingly affected students of color. It also got the attention of the state attorney general, who is now investigating.

Hair is an integral part of black cultural expression, but it has little to do with educational development, says John H. Jackson, president and CEO of the Schott Foundation. His response, highlighted in recent media reports, was a sharp dressing-down of a charter school in Malden, Mass., that disciplined African American girls who wore braided hair extensions to school.

Telling Our Story at 25

To commemorate our 25th anniversary, we just published a document that chronicles our history and explores our approach to supporting movements for education justice. To date, Schott has given more than $38 million through 931 grants to local, regional and national nonprofit organizations. In addition, we've leveraged another $70 million in funding to accelerate results. But our resourcing strategy takes it a step further. When we partner, we add customized support for individual grantee campaigns, through communication, policy, networking and philanthropic leveraging supports.

Resourcing Movements Philanthropy and Advocacy Partnerships to Secure the Opportunity to Learn

"The Battle for Public Education is Personal, Historical, Legal, and Moral."

Rev. Dr. William Barber was presented with a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Schott Foundation 25th Anniversary Awards Gala, and his acceptance speech brought the crowd to their feet and quickly went viral.

Rev. Dr. William Barber was presented with a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Schott Foundation 25th Anniversary Awards Gala, and his acceptance speech brought the crowd to their feet and quickly went viral.

Watch his full speech below, and share the message with your friends:

Breaking Down Silos at Schott's 25th Anniversary Forum

The Schott Foundation's 25th Anniversary Forum was a half-day event that brought together a packed room full of advocates, organizers, and funders from across the field of education justice. The Forum was built around two panels: one with foundation presidents, the other with advocacy, policy and public sector leaders, followed by an interactive dialogue.
State: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Fair and Just School Climate